Senior living (how to be hip but elder)

NEW (and just thinking about it)
Tickproof Your Yard Without Spraying (Paul Hope, Consumer Reports, 5-9-18)
How to Save Money With a Cheap Cell-Phone Service (Bree Fowler, Consumer Reports, 5-26-18) A low-cost plan can be a great deal, but be sure to factor in your data usage and choice of phone
EWG's Guide to Bug Repellents in the Age of Zika: What you can do about Zika (The Environmental Working Group).
EWG's Good Seafood Guide
EWG's Tap Water Database
EWG's Skin Deep Cosmetics Database
EWG's Updated Water Filter Buying Guide
EWG's 2018 Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce

Dirty Dozen Endocrine Disruptors (EWG) 12 Hormone-Altering Chemicals and How to Avoid Them
EWG's Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use
Five Reasons to Skip Bottled Water (EWG)


Every Senior Living Community Needs a Buddy Bench (Steve Moran, Steve Moran, Senior Housing Forum, 4-7-16)
Most Useful Gifts for Loved Ones in Assisted Living (Jennifer Wegerer, A Place for Mom, 12-12-13)
10 Products You’ve Never Heard Of (That Will Make Your Life Easier) (Sarah Stevenson, A Place for Mom, 1-6-14)
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Practical concerns in the health care system
When the Target of Bias Is the Doctor (Robin Warshaw, special to the Association of American Medical Colleges, 5-9-17) “In medical school, an African American friend and I were routinely mistaken for a janitor or cleaning person.”--Altaf Saadi, MD
"Overt, explicit bigotry against physicians as happened to Reynolds is not an everyday problem at teaching hospitals. But not uncommon is subtle discriminatory behavior—patients making remarks about a doctor’s race, ethnicity, or religion, for example."

The perfect quotation for various occasions and predicaments


Live your life the way you want to be remembered.
• "And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music." — Friedrich Nietzsche —

• "Fate is like a strange, unpopular restaurant filled with odd little waiters who bring you things you never asked for and don't always like." — Lemony Snicket
• "Growing older is like climbing a mountain: the higher you get, the more strength you need, but the further you see." — Ingmar Bergman
• "My grandfather always said that living is like licking honey off a thorn." — Louis Adamic
• "New poems no longer come to me, with their prodigies of metaphor and assonance. Prose endures. I feel the circles grow smaller, and old age is a ceremony of losses, which is on the whole preferable to dying at forty-seven or fifty-two. When I lament and darken over my diminishments, I accomplish nothing. It’s better to sit at the window all day, pleased to watch birds, barns, and flowers. It is a pleasure to write about what I do." — Donald Hall, Out the Window (The New Yorker, 1-23-12)
• Religion is following the messenger. Spirituality is following the message.
• “We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.” — Elie Wiesel
• "You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough." — Mae West
"The alternative to growing old is dying young." — Sally Field
"A man is not old until regrets take the place of dreams." — John Barrymore
"Love lights more fires than hate extinguishes." — Ella Wheeler Wilcox
“Sexiness wears thin after awhile and beauty fades, but to be married to a man who makes you laugh every day, ah, now that is a treat.” — Joanne Woodward
"The most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don't have any." — Alice Walker
"You're never too old to become younger." ~ Mae West
"It is not by , speed, or physical dexterity that great things are achieved, but by reflection, force of character, and judgment; and in these qualities old age is usually not only not poorer, but is even richer." — Cicero (106-43 B.C.)
"Joy is the happiness that doesn't depend on what happens." — David Steindl-Rast, a Benedictine monk and teacher, founder of A Network for Grateful Living, author of David Steindl-Rast: Essential Writings
"One rule of the game, in most times and places, is that it’s the young who are beautiful. The beauty ideal is always a youthful one. This is partly simple realism. The young are beautiful. The whole lot of ’em. The older I get, the more clearly I see that and enjoy it...
Attitude is (nearly) everything
"And yet I look at men and women my age and older, and their scalps and knuckles and spots and bulges, though various and interesting, don’t affect what I think of them. Some of these people I consider to be very beautiful, and others I don’t. For old people, beauty doesn’t come free with the hormones, the way it does for the young. It has to do with bones. It has to do with who the person is. More and more clearly it has to do with what shines through those gnarly faces and bodies."
— Ursula LeGuin: Aging and What Beauty Really Means
“Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.” ~Albert Einstein
“To enjoy and give enjoyment, without injury to yourself or others; this is true morality.” ~ Nicolas Chamfort
“Usefulness is not impaired by imperfection; you can drink from a chipped cup.” ~ Greta K. Nagel
“The afternoon knows what the morning never suspected.” ~ Robert Frost
"Forever is composed of nows." ~ Emily Dickinson
The Thing About Life Is That One Day You'll Be Dead, David Shields' excellent autobiography of his body, is a fascinating little book about life and death and about what's happening to your body enroute from one to the other. Don't read it if you don't want to hear the bad news, but it does help explain things like why you have to make more trips to the bathroom as you age.
“In any given moment we have two options: to step forward into growth or to step back into safety.” ~ Abraham Maslow.
"Learn from the mistakes of others. You can't live long enough to make them all yourself." ~ Eleanor Roosevelt
“That is happiness; to be dissolved into something complete and great. When it comes to one, it comes as naturally as sleep.” ~ Willa Cather
“What is to give light must endure burning.” ~ Viktor Frankl
" We are not all born at once, but by bits. The body first, and the spirit later... Our mothers are racked with the pains of our physical birth; we ourselves suffer the longer pains of our spiritual growth."~ Mary Austin
" Life is not a matter of holding good cards, but of playing a poor hand well." ~ Robert Louis Stevenson
"Perhaps one of the gifts of old age is that nothing stands between us and what we see." ~ May Sarton, Kinds of Love
"No one can make you feel inferior without your consent." ~Eleanor Roosevelt
"Love makes your soul crawl out from its hiding place." ~ Zora Neale Hurston
"The enemy is fear. We think it is hate, but it is fear." ~Gandhi
" I am not eccentric. It's just that I am more alive than most people. I am an unpopular electric eel set in a pond of catfish." ~ poet Edith Sitwell
"There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle." ~ Albert Einstein
"Wabi-sabi is flea markets, not warehouse stores; aged wood, not Pergo; rice paper, not glass. It celebrates cracks and crevices and all the other marks that time, weather, and loving use leave behind. It reminds us that we are all but transient beings on this planet--that our bodies as well as the material world around us are in the process of returning to the dust from which we came. Through wabi-sabi, we learn to embrace liver spots, rust, and frayed edges, and the march of time they represent."
~What Is Wabi Sabi?, from the book The Wabi-Sabi House: The Japanese Art of Imperfect Beauty by Robyn Griggs Lawrence and Joe Coca
"Your vocation in life is where your greatest joy meets the world's greatest need." ~ Frederick Buechner
"Aging brings home to us what we have done or failed to do with our lives, our creativity or our waste, our openness to zealous hiding from what really matters. Precisely at this point, age cracks us open, sometimes for the first time, makes us aware of the center, makes us look for it in relation to it. Aging does not mark an end but rather a beginning of making sense of end questions, so that life can have an end in every sense of the word." ~ Ann Belford Ulanov, writing about why older people are able to be such effective ministers, in Aging: On the Way to One’s End (Harper & Row, 1981), p. 122
"Ripe old age, cheerful, useful, and understanding, is one of the finest influences in the world."
~ Ida Tarbell, The Business of Being a Woman
"Life may not be the party we expected, but while we're here, we might as well dance."
~ spotted on a tee shirt at Glen Echo's Spanish Ballroom
Oh, life is a glorious cycle of song,
A medley of extemporanea;
And love is a thing that can never go wrong;
And I am Marie of Romania.
~ Dorothy Parker, in Not So Deep as a Well
“We're all just walking each other home.” ~Ram Dass
"Some people are so afraid to die that they never begin to live." ~Henry Van Dyke
"The idea is to die young as late as possible." ~Ashley Montagu
"The years between 50 and 70 are the hardest. You are always being asked to do things, and yet you are not decrepit enough to turn them down."~ T. S. Eliot
"BACKWARD, turn backward, O Time, in your flight,
Make me a child again just for to-night!"
~ from the poem Rock Me to Sleep by Elizabeth (Akers) Allen (full text appears on Bartleby.com)

Quotations, section 2
“I will age ungracefully until I become an old woman in a small garden, doing whatever the hell I want.” ~ Robin Chotzinoff
The Paradox of Choice. Psychologist Barry Schwartz takes aim at a central tenet of western societies: freedom of choice. In Schwartz's estimation, choice has made us not freer but more paralyzed, not happier but more dissatisfied. "The secret to life is low expectations." Great cartoons.
"If old age in the shape of waning strength says to me often, 'Thou shalt not!' so do my years smile upon me and say to me, 'Thou needst not.'
~ Mary Heaton Vorse, Autobiography of an Elderly Woman (1911)
"Old age would be the most happy of the stage of life, if only it did not know it was the last."
"Time is a dressmaker specializing in alterations." ~Faith Baldwin
What happens to a social media account after a person's death? --Great Lakes Caskets
"After one has lived a life of meaning, death may lose much of its terror, for what we fear most is not really death but a meaningless and absurd life." ~Robert Butler, author of Why Survive? Being Old in America
“The good physician treats the disease; the great physician treats the patient who has the disease.” ~Dr. William Osler
"No matter how fast light travels it finds the darkness has always got there first, and is waiting for it." ~ Terry Pratchett
Living with Lou: Dudley Clendinen on a Good, Short Life by Dudley Clendinen (NYTimes, 7-9-11). Living with Lou Gehrig's disease is about life, when you know there's not much left. And Writer Dudley Clendinen has chosen not to go to the great expense and limited potential of extending his life--but to enjoy what he can of it, while he can. He learned he had the disease when he was 66, and Maryland Morning, an NPR news station, has been airing conversations with him about how he and his daughter Whitney have been dealing with the disease and its implications. Listen to the podcasts: Living with Lou: Dudley Clendinen on a Good, Short Life (Maryland Morning, 2-21-11)
~ Comtesse Diane, Les Glanes de la Vie

Fame is a bee
It has a song——
It has a sting——
Ah, too, it has a wing.
~ Emily Dickinson